Societal Challenges

  • Climate & Ecosystems

    • Paleoclimate
      Paleoclimate

      We are facing amplified global warming since the 1970s, a rising sea level, regional climate shifts, and extreme climate events that severely impact the human habitat. Thus, we have an obligation to conduct research that provides an understanding of present and past variations in regional and global climate.

    • Deep Life
      Deep Life

      Little is known about  the lower depth limit of life. The factors that control the abundance and activities of microorganisms at depth are still poorly understood. There is only a very limited number of boreholes with a focus on the Deep Biosphere.

    • Impact Structures
      Impact Structures

      Each day extraterrestrial matter collides with Earth. Throughout Earth's history, giant impacts created wide craters and devastations affecting the whole planet. These events may have wiped out major portions of the fauna and flora on the Earth. Still, large impacts are the fastest geological events creating new ground for evolution.

    • Volcanoes
      Volcanoes

      Volcanic eruptions may contribute to global climate change by changing the Earth's atmosphere. This can either be warming of the atmosphere through gases such as CO2, or global cooling through suspended volcanic particles. Understanding the interplay between volcanic activities and climate variations requires knowledge of both volcanic and climate history.

  • Sustainable Georesources

    • Deep Life
      Deep Life

      Bacteria, viruses and archaea dwell at depths to several thousand meters below ground and in temperatures of more than 120° C. With their metabolism they contribute to the generation of carbohydrates and mineral resources. These rich ecosystems are studied by scientific drilling.

    • Volcanoes
      Volcanoes

      Inside the Earth there is heat so intense that it melts rock and drives tectonic processes and planetary differentiation. Geothermal energy can be tapped from the Earth's natural heat at volcanoes or mantle plumes. Holes drilled into a subsurface geothermal system, or in volcanic areas, can drive turbines and generate electrical power.

    • Element Cycles
      Element Cycles

      Drilling can help identify and develop increasingly sparse natural resources, e.g. minerals, hydrocarbons, and water.

    • Plate Margins
      Plate Margins

      Most of the erosion and deposition of sediments is culminating along the plate margins. This may form deposits of georesources, accessible only by drilling. 

  • Natural Hazards

    • Faults
      Faults

      Active faulting is by far the most common earthquake-generating process. However, little is known on fault processes. Only deep drilling provides access to seismogenic zones for monitoring and to retrieve samples from there. 

    • Volcanoes
      Volcanoes

      Volcanic eruptions are one of Earth's most dramatic and violent agents of change. Powerful explosive eruptions can drastically alter land and water for tens of kilometers around a volcano. Some volcanoes exhibit precursory unrest that if detected, (e.g. by drilling), and analyzed in time allows eruptions to be anticipated.

    • Impact Structures
      Impact Structures

      Currently ca. 170 impact craters are known on Earth; about one third of those structures are not exposed on the surface, and can only be studied by geophysics or drilling. Drill cores yield information on the subsurface structures, and provide ground-truth for geophysical studies.

    • Plate Margins
      Plate Margins

      Plate margins are areas where the most life-threatening geological phenomena occurs. Accompanying ocean-margin geohazards include tsunamis, landslides, powerful volcanic eruptions, and other threats. Scientific drilling has a high potential for risk-mitigation studies, and must be an integral and indispensable part of this effort.

New milestone in Songliao Drilling

Cretaceous Songliao Basin (SK-II) reached a new milestone: the depth of 6000m. Read more...

DSEIS drilling at Site MOAB

Orkney, South Africa

DSEIS -Drilling into Seismogenic Zones of South African Goldmines at Site MOAB  Read more...

continued from highlight New milestone in Songliao Drilling

SK-II completed its stage IV (216mm diameter) last November at the depth of 5922.58m and after a long winter shutdown, started its final stage V (152mm diameter) on 4th May, 2017.

As at the hole bottom, the temperature rises to 205 Celsius, and the ground stress releases, a strong collapse occurred at the barefoot interval beneath the casing pipe, which is the most serious and complex accident since SK-II starts. After many ineffective attempts to recover the borehole, and the collapse has become increasingly serious. The command decides to inject cement into the borehole for wall stabilization. Since there is no experience for well cementation in this high temperature in China, the well cementing team has made a lot of experiments and field preparation, and finally succeeded in stabilizing the wall.

On 12th Aug, the stage IV (152mm diameter) started from 5932m, and reached the new milestone 6000m on 23th Aug. with the 96.90% core recovery.

A key interface of the sedimentary rock and volcanic rock of Huoshiling Formation is completely cored. At the moment, SK-II is drilling its deepest and most difficult interval, which is a great challenge for the coring and drilling fluid technology as the super high temperature and pressure environment. Songliao Team will forge ahead and make further progress towards the ultimate goal depth of 6400m.

Twenty-meter-long core tripping out from 5981.29 to 6002.23m